UVic ACE METRICS COLLOQUIUM 2016

UVic ACE METRICS COLLOQUIUM 2019

STUDENT A2J PAPERS

National ACTION COMMITTEE on ACCESS to JUSTICE in CIVIL and FAMILY MATTERS

A2J & METRICS 


DEVELOPING A CROSS-SECTOR JUSTICE METRICS STRATEGY

The following research reports are part of a project to support a coordinated provincial strategy to enhance the quality and comprehensiveness of justice metrics and empirical research on A2J in in BC.

  • What do we want to know about Access to Justice in BC? Current research into the civil justice system is insufficient to answer even basic questions about its operation. It is unclear who uses the courts, for what, and at what cost. This report focuses on the question, "What do we want to know?" It presents the findings of a literature review and consultation with civil justice organizations on their research priorities, the most important of which were found to be the needs of clients, the effectiveness of different service delivery models, and the case and client characteristics that affect access to justice. These findings provide direction for the planning of a research agenda.

  • Learning from justice metrics models in other jurisdictions. This study reviews literature from Australia, the USA, the Netherlands, the UK, and Canada on significant existing work on the justice metrics problem. The aim is to capitalize on work already completed in other jurisdictions to enhance justice data quality, encourage data sharing, and expand the use of empirical research and justice program evaluation. Lessons are extracted for BC from the other jurisdictions' experience, such as the broad principles and objectives from Australia's Strategic Framework for Access to Justice and specific indicators and outcomes used for research in the Netherlands and Canada.

  •  A Supreme Lack of Information. On September 15, 2015, the Canadian Forum on Civil Justice published a report into the outcomes of civil non-family cases in the Supreme Court of BC that was intended to investigate what happens to the 98% of superior court cases filed that do not go to trial. The study was hampered by missing information in court records and could not be completed as initially intended. This study follows up on the 2015 Attrition Report and explores the problems it encountered and what could be done to fix them. The key issues were missing case type identification, a lack of mock data for planning, a lack of comprehensive case records, and limited ability to contact parties.

  • Organizing and accessing justice data in BC. This report analyzes the desirability and feasibility of various approaches to collection and sharing of justice data. Following the UVic ACE research colloquium in 2016, there was some doubt as to whether a justice data scan was possible. This consultation paper records the results of interviews regarding the undertaking of a data scan and ways to access and share the data found, including interviews with CREATE Justice regarding their experience conducting a data scan in Saskatchewan. It is agreed that a data scan is important to do to understand the present landscape, but at an overview level to avoid overwhelming complexity. Much data is poorly documented and connected with complex links, and ability to respond to a data scan will vary across and within organizations. The question of what to do with the data recovered is also addressed, with the "data observatory" model in particular explored as a means of accessing justice data.

The following two data and metrics reports were produced through the University of Saskatchewan’s  Dean’s Forum on Access to Justice and Dispute Resolution in 2018:

Consultation papers